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Close Communities from Far Away: How Keānuenue Pediatrics Fights for the Underdog

In October of 2020, Dr. Jasmine Waipa founded Keānuenue Pediatrics in Honolulu, Hawai`i, with a goal to create a small practice atmosphere with a tech-forward approach. As a Native Hawaiian pediatrician, she is passionate about addressing health disparities.
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Getting Resourceful, Staying Close: Small Town Healthcare for a Growing Community

In November 2019, The Independent Pediatrician visited Skagit Pediatrics in Mount Vernon, Washington. The managing pediatricians shared the story of the practice’s history, growth, and how despite consistent change, their independent culture has thrived after nearly 40 years.
A parent and his toddler explore a digital tablet

Finding the Middle Way with Kids and Digital Media

The impacts of digital media use on children, both positive and negative, are increasingly visible as Generation Z comes of age. How do different types of media affect childhood brain development, and what can pediatricians do to help kids build healthy relationships with their screens?

Trauma-Informed Care and the Future of Wellness

Melding her expertise in psychology and criminal justice, forensic psychologist Dr. Aron Steward explains the importance of trauma-informed care to the future of children’s health, and the health of our society.

Resilience, Relationships and Community: Fostering Wellness and Preventing Burnout

Several independent pediatricians offer their own stories and strategies to foster wellness and prevent burnout, a syndrome that affects over 40 percent of pediatricians nationally.
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Keeping the Doors Open: 100 Years of Independent Practice

How does a hundred-year-old practice maintain its mission, vision, and quality over time? El Paso Pediatrics offers a look into the structures, values, and patient-centered approaches that allow for continued success. Dr. Joseph Segapeli discusses the joys and challenges of working in this long-standing independent practice.
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Rural America’s Invisible Patients, Part III: Appalachia

Increased access to pediatric care for rural poor populations could alter the course of a child’s life, and widespread access could change a community’s future. This part of the series highlights the challenges faced by Appalachian communities in securing access to pediatric care.
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Rural America’s Invisible Patients, Part II: Tribal Lands

Increased access to pediatric care for rural poor populations could alter the course of a child’s life, and widespread access could change a community’s future. This part of the series highlights the challenges faced by Reservation communities in securing access to pediatric care.
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Rural America’s Invisible Patients, Part I: The South

Increased access to pediatric care for rural poor populations could alter the course of children’s lives, and widespread access could change a community’s future. Three distinct regions of the U.S. provide lenses through which to examine questions of access, utilization, and solutions for the future.
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Collaboration and Cooperation: Integrating Mental Health Care into a Pediatric Practice

At Parker Pediatrics and Adolescents in Colorado, Dr. Jay Rabinowitz took a leap into the unknown by bringing licensed mental health professionals into his practice as employees. Dr. Mark Harris went on a similar journey in Vermont, where he integrated mental health services into his practice, Upper Valley Pediatrics, in the 1990s. In both locations, integrated mental health care has been beneficial for patients and providers, filling a dire need in the community.